In an attempt to raise awareness of homophobia around the world, one trans model wore a gown made of flags representing each country where homophobia is the norm. Collected by the COC, a Dutch organization that fights for equality for the LGBTQ community, the flags were compiled to prove that fashion can, and does, change the world, especially when brave people like trans model Valentijn De Hingh are willing to put themselves on the line.

Why this dress matters

Designed by Mattijs van Bergen and artist Oeri van Woezik, the dress is the most beautiful form of a call-out probably ever. According to Style.Mic, it raises awareness of the 72 different countries where homosexuality is against the law, and of the simple fact that, internationally, homophobia is still a *major* issue. Even as we make progress, there is so much to be done, and it’s all too easy for us to forget our role in ending homophobia once and for all.

Worn by model, DJ, and trans advocate Valentijn De Hingh, the dress is *so* much more than just a dress. It’s a statement that says, do better.

img_7346

Behind the dress

The iconic image’s photographer, Pieter Henket, explained the reasoning behind the photograph.

”I then was asked to come on board to create a image. And where best to do that then in front of one of the most beautiful paintings in the world ‘the night watch’ by Rembrandt in “Het Rijksmuseum.’”

The dress didn’t come easily. It took a lot of work, Henket wrote in the Instagram post, but it was *by far* worth it.

”Everyone spend a crazy 4 days of pre and post production but we did it and we delivered,” Henket explained. “I am more then proud to present the beautiful Valentijn de Hingh in the Rainbow dress in the Honor gallery of ‘Het Rijksmuseum.’”

We have to keep talking about queer and trans rights

The dress, in a word, is stunning. The fact that it was released in honor of Euro Pride is incredible, because the move recognizes that, as lovely as Pride is, it isn’t the end of the fight for equality. The team announced that they will replace each country’s flag with a rainbow flag as they improve the state of LGBT rights in their countries.

”Every country that changes its legislation will have its flag replaced by a rainbow flag,” De Hingh wrote on Instagram. “Let’s hope this dress will represent a patchwork of rainbows sooner rather than later!”

We also totally, totally hope progress continues to be made. Even home in the U.S., trans women are being murdered at an alarming rate (and, when mainstream media bothers to cover it, they are often misgendered), and the mental health risk among bi women has been called “disturbing.” While marriage equality is awesome (because, duh), we still have to keep fighting for justice for everyone.

”Happy pride everyone!” Henket wrote. “Let there be Love!”

And we 100% agree.

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

Dutch Fashion Designer Mattijs van Bergen and spatial designer Oeri van Woezik created an Amsterdam Rainbow Dress in collaboration with COC Amsterdam and showcased it on Friday.

But, the message behind this dress is everything:

The dress is designed to highlight the rights of LGBT community at a global level. Adorned by a transgender model Valentijn de Hingh, the bodice of the dress has Amsterdam flag on it as it is known to be the safest place for LGBT people. And, the layers of the gown are made up of flags of 72 countries where LGBT has no rights or it is illegal.

Peter de Ruijter, Chairman, COC Amsterdam stated, “Historically, Amsterdam has always been a safe haven for those who were not safe because of their ideas or because of who they were.”

“We wanted, however, to give an activating message, that this role as a safe haven is not automatic. It needs to be supported and upheld by the Amsterdam citizens from a shared understanding of equality for all… Given the current influx of refugees from the Middle East and Africa the dress signals to the Amsterdam citizens: contribute, involve yourselves, connect.”

So profound!

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

Trans model Valentijn de Hingh is helping to bring attention to the plight of LGBT people around the world with a stunning dress made of flags from the 72 countries where homosexuality is illegal.

“During the opening walk of euro pride in Amsterdam 2 weeks ago, 72 flags of 72 different countries where homosexuality is against the law were present, in 12 of these countries you still get the death penalty for being gay,” writes Pieter Henket, the photographer who captured the stunning dress.

“The COC (Dutch organization for LGBT men and women) collected these flags and together with Fashion designer Matthijs van Bergen and artist Oeri van Woezik they decided to make these flags into a giant rainbow dress,” writes the Dutch photographer who currently lives in New York City.

img_8002Image by Jochem Kaan

De Hingh, who became the first transgender person ever to have been represented by IMG Models, posed in the dress at the famous Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, which played host to EuroPride this weekend.

“That little lady wearing the big dress is me,” she posted on Instagram. “Every country that changes its legislation will have its flag replaced by a rainbow flag. Let’s hope this dress will represent a patchwork of rainbows sooner rather than later.”

The 26-year-old Dutch model was EuroPride’s first transgender ambassador.

“I dreamt of becoming a Disney princess,” de Hingh said last year. “I especially loved the character of Ariel, the little mermaid, who needed to change her body in order to change herself.”

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

From September 7 – September 11 2016, the Amsterdam Rainbow Dress project will be part of the Amsterdam cultural trade mission traveling to New York City to promote arts and culture. More than 60 institutions will take part in this mission and our team will be present to promote the Amsterdam Rainbow Dress in the Big Apple. An article (in Dutch) about the mission:

Read more

Did you know that there are 72 countries in the world where homosexuality is still illegal? And in 12 of those countries, you can get the death penalty for being gay?

In order to highlight how we still have some way to go before homosexuality is accepted and celebrated around the world, designer Mattijs van Bergen and artist Oeri van Woezik created a dress that is as beautiful as it is a shocking statement.

The gown is made from the flags of the 72 countries where homosexuality is banned and during Euro Pride in Amsterdam, trans model Valentijn de Hingh wore the impressive creation for an portrait photograph.

View this post on Instagram

I am so proud to see many thousands of people share my photo all over the world to spread the love. ❤️💙💜💛💚 During the opening walk of euro pride in Amsterdam 2 weeks ago, 72 flags of 72 different countries where homosexuality is against the law were present, in 12 of these countries you still get the death penalty for being gay. the COC (Dutch organization for LGBT men and women) collected these flags and together with Fashion designer Mattijs van Bergen and artist Oeri van Woezik they decided to make these flags into a giant rainbow dress. That's when the idea started. I then was asked to come on board to create a image. And where best to do that then in front of one of the most beautiful paintings in the world "the night watch" by Rembrandt in "Het Rijksmuseum" Roger and I decided Monday morning to fly out that same night to holland to do this project that in many ways is very close to our harts. Everyone spend a crazy 4 days of pre and post production but we did it and we delivered. I am more then proud to present the beautiful Valentijn de Hingh in the Rainbow dress in the Gallery of Honour of "Het Rijksmuseum" Thank you Arnout van Krimpen, Jochem Kaan and everyone that made this all possible in such a short period of time. Thank you Happy pride everyone! Let there be Love! Video by @rolandpupupin

A post shared by 𝐏𝐈𝐄𝐓𝐄𝐑 𝐇𝐄𝐍𝐊𝐄𝐓 (@pieterhenket) on

Photographer Pieter Henket wrote on Instagram “The COC (Dutch organization for LGBT men and women) collected these flags and together with Fashion designer Matthijs van Bergen and artist Oeri van Woezik they decided to make these flags into a giant rainbow dress.

“I then was asked to come on board to create a image. And where best to do that then in front of one of the most beautiful paintings in the world “the night watch” by Rembrandt in “Het Rijksmuseum”

Not only is this dress a feat of fashion but it also makes a statement and reminds the world that the fight for equality is nowhere near over.

De Hingh wrote on Instagram “Every country that changes its legislation will have its flag replaced by a rainbow flag. Let’s hope this dress will represent a patchwork of rainbows sooner rather than later!”

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

Het Nieuwe Instituut, het Museum voor Architectuur, Design en Digitale Cultuur in het Museumpark, toont ter gelegenheid van de Rotterdam Pride de Amsterdam Rainbow Dress, het kunstwerk dat oproept tot openheid en inclusiviteit en dat aanzet tot het actief bijdragen aan het verdedigen en delen van (verworven) vrijheden.

datum: 20/09/2016 – 25/09/2016
locatie: Het Nieuwe Instituut Museumpark 25 3015 CB Rotterdam
toegang: gratis

Read more

De Amsterdam Rainbow Dress, een speciaal kunstwerk van Mattijs van Bergen en Oeri van Woezik, is vrijdagmiddag onthuld in het Amsterdam Museum.

Model en ambassadeur van EuroPride 2016 Valentijn de Hingh presenteerde de jurk, waarvan eerder door fotograaf Pieter Henket een fotoreportage in het Rijksmuseum werd gemaakt.

Het werk is een co-creatie van modeontwerper Mattijs van Bergen en ruimtelijk vormgever Oeri van Woezik. In de zestien meter lange jurk zijn 72 nationale vlaggen verwerkt van landen waar homoseksualiteit nog altijd is opgenomen in het wetboek van strafrecht.

img_0592

Doodstraf

Het lijfje van de Amsterdam Rainbow Dress is gemaakt van de Amsterdamse vlag. Hiermee wordt onderstreept dat Amsterdam open blijft staan voor lhbt-vluchtelingen.

Ontwerper Van Bergen: “Dat vrijheid op liefde nog steeds in zoveel landen wordt ingeperkt, is schrikbarend. De Gay Pride is niet alleen een feest, maar vooral ook een momentum om duidelijk te kunnen maken wat volgens ons universeel voor alle mensen wereldwijd belangrijk is of zou moeten zijn”.

Vaste collectie

Onder andere de vlaggen van Iran, Irak, Mauritanië, Saoedi-Arabië, Sudan en Jemen zijn in de jurk verwerkt. In die landen staat de doodstraf op homoseksualiteit.

Elk jaar zal gekeken worden of de wetgeving in de landen die vertegenwoordigd zijn in de Amsterdam Rainbow Dress is aangepast. Mocht in een van de landen homoseksualiteit niet langer strafbaar zijn dan zal de vlag vervangen worden door een regenboogvlag.

De jurk is tot en met zondag te bezichtigen in de binnenplaats van het Amsterdam Museum. Daarna wordt de jurk naar verwachting onderdeel van de vaste collectie van het museum.

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

European designer Mattijs Van Bergen joins CTV NCH to discuss his ‘Rainbow dress’ – a dress made from the flags of 72 countries where homosexuality is still banned.

Watch the interview here.

schermafbeelding-2016-10-07-om-19-21-45

[sgmb id=1]

Deze Rainbow Dress van Mattijs van Bergen gaat de wereld over. ​En niet om de minste reden.

De EuroPride 2016 zit er alweer op. Maar dat betekent niet dat alles meteen vergeten en verzonken is, want du moment gaat het belangrijkste kledingstuk van de EuroPride, de Rainbow Dress van Mattijs van Bergen, de wereld rond. Rinkelt er geen belletje? Dit is de spraakmakende jurk:

Eén blik op de gigantische jurk en je begrijpt waarom-ie zo in opspraak is: hij is zestien meter lang en bestaat uit 72 nationale vlaggen van landen waar homoseksualiteit nog altijd illegaal is. In het lijfje is de Amsterdamse vlag verwerkt, om te onderstrepen dat Amsterdam openstaat voor LHBT-vluchtelingen (Lesbisch-Homoseksueel-Biseksueel-Transgender). Laat de Rainbow Dress nou ook nog eens gedragen worden door transgendermodel Valentijn de Hingh, ELLE Personal Style Award-winnares van 2012, en het plaatje is compleet.

Verbod op liefde

De jurk is een samenwerking van modeontwerper Mattijs van Bergen en ruimtelijk vormgever Oeri van Woezik. ‘Dat vrijheid op liefde nog steeds in zoveel landen wordt ingeperkt, is schrikbarend. De Gay Pride is niet alleen een feest, maar vooral ook een momentum om duidelijk te kunnen maken wat volgens ons universeel voor alle mensen wereldwijd belangrijk is of zou moeten zijn,’ aldus Van Bergen.

En nu het allermooiste: zodra een land zijn wetgeving aanpast en homoseksualiteit niet langer strafbaar is, wordt de vlag van dat land vervangen door een regenboogvlag. Valentijn: ‘Laten we hopen dat deze jurk snel een lappenwerk aan regenbogen representeert – liever vandaag dan morgen!’

Bekijk hier ook de making-off van de indrukwekkende shoot in het Rijksmuseum. Waar de Nederlandse fotograaf Pieter Henket in de Eregalerij voor de Nachtwacht Valentijn fotografeerde in de Rainbow Dress. ‘Het licht op haar gezicht heb ik net zo gedaan als het licht wat Rembrandt gebruikte,’ aldus Henket. En het resultaat is inderdaad even stunning als tijdloos.

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

Mattijs van Bergen en Oeri van Woezik maakten een jurk met de stadsvlag van Amsterdam en vlaggen van landen waar homoseksualiteit nog strafbaar is.

Modeontwerper Mattijs van Bergen en ruimtelijk vormgever Oeri van Woezik onthulden vrijdag 5 augustus hun creatie, de Amsterdam Rainbow Dress in samenwerking met COC Amsterdam.

De onthulling vond plaats bij COC’s Shakespeare Club in het Amsterdam Museum. Deze zestien meter lange jurk met de stadsvlag van Amsterdam en vlaggen van landen waar homoseksuele handelingen nog steeds strafbaar zijn (72 landen) onderstreept het belang van vrijheid van expressie, veiligheid, openheid en diversiteit die Amsterdam aan LHBT-ers biedt.

Topmodel Valentijn de Hingh presenteerde de jurk en fotograaf Pieter Henket maakte een fotoreportage in het Rijksmuseum.

schermafbeelding-2016-10-07-om-19-07-00

Amsterdam Rainbow Dress

De jurk is een co-creatie van fashion designer Mattijs van Bergen en ruimtelijk vormgever Oeri van Woezik. In de jurk zijn de nationale vlaggen verwerkt van landen waar homoseksualiteit nog altijd is opgenomen in het wetboek van strafrecht.

Het lijfje van de Amsterdam Rainbow Dress is gemaakt van de Amsterdamse vlag. Hiermee wordt het belang onderstreept dat Amsterdam open blijft staan voor LHBT-vluchtelingen die in hun land worden vervolgd om wie zij zijn of van wie zij houden.

“Het idee ontstond spontaan toen ons de vlaggen van de afgelopen Pride Walk werden aangeboden. We hebben met deze jurk de internationale boodschap van de vlaggenparade op de Pride Walk / Roze Zaterdag vertaald naar een lokale boodschap van verbinding in Amsterdam”,

aldus Arnout van Krimpen, activiteiten team COC Amsterdam. Van Bergen en Van Woezik onderstrepen het belang van vrije expressie:

“Jezelf kunnen zijn, doen wat je voelt, vrijelijk je kunnen uiten, is essentieel voor je geluk en je persoonlijke ontwikkeling. Dat vrijheid op liefde nog steeds in zoveel landen wordt ingeperkt, is schrikbarend. De gaypride is niet alleen een feest, maar vooral ook een momentum om duidelijk te kunnen maken wat volgens ons universeel voor alle mensen wereldwijd belangrijk is of zou moeten zijn”.

Na EuroPride 2016

Elk jaar zal gekeken worden of de wetgeving in de landen die vertegenwoordigd zijn in de Amsterdam Rainbow Dress is aangepast. Mocht in een van de landen homoseksualiteit niet langer strafbaar zijn dan zal de vlag vervangen worden door een regenboogvlag. Dit zal tijdens een jaarlijkse ‘Amsterdam LGBT Freedom Ceremony’ bekend gemaakt worden.

Amsterdam

Amsterdam is door de eeuwen heen een ‘shelter city’ geweest voor mensen die op andere plekken in Nederland, Europa, of de wereld niet veilig waren om de denkbeelden die zij hadden, of om de persoon die zij waren.

“Amsterdam als ‘veilige haven’, ook voor LHBT-vluchtelingen uit deze 72 landen, ontstaat niet vanzelf. Het is belangrijk dat Amsterdammers vanuit een gezamenlijk besef van gelijkwaardigheid zich inzetten voor openheid, inclusiviteit”,

aldus Peter de Ruijter, voorzitter van COC Amsterdam.

COC’s Shakespeare Club bij het Amsterdam Museum

De Amsterdam Rainbow Dress werd gepresenteerd bij COC’s Shakespeare Club. De Shakespeare Club is elke avond tot 23 uur geopend tot en met aanstaande zondag 7 augustus. Deze plek is binnen de EuroPride bedoeld als een hang-out waar je mensen kunt ontmoeten en altijd iets te doen is. Ze is gecreëerd om het zeventig jarig bestaan van COC Amsterdam en COC Nederland te vieren. Peter de Ruijter:

“De energie van verbinding en ontmoeting tijdens twee weken Shakespeare Club was fantastisch. Hiermee kunnen de vrijwilligers van COC Amsterdam verder bijdragen aan de openheid, inclusiviteit in een divers Amsterdam door nieuwe samenwerking binnen en buiten de LHBT-gemeenschap”.

Landen waar homoseksuele handelingen strafbaar zijn:

– Afrika: Algerije, Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Kameroen, Comoren, Egypte, Eritrea, Ethiopië, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenia, Liberia, Libië, Malawi, Mauritanië, Mauritius, Marokko, Namibië, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalië, Zuid Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunesië, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
– Azië: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Gaza (in de Bezette
Palestijnse Gebieden), India, Zuid Sumatra en de Atjeh provincie (in Indonesië), Irak, Iran, Koeweit, Libanon, Maleisië, Malediven, Myanmar, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saoedi-Arabië, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Syrië, Turkmenistan, Verenigde Arabische Emiraten, Oezbekistan, Jemen.
– Latijns Amerika & Caribisch gebied: Antigua en Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Saint Kitts en Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent en de Grenadines, Trinidad en Tobago.
– Oceanië: Cookeilanden (vrije associatie met Nieuw-Zeeland), Kiribati, Papua Nieuw Guinea, Samoa, Salomonseilanden, Tonga, Tuvalu.
– Landen waar de doodstraf staat op homoseksuele handelingen: Iran, Irak, Mauritanië, Saoedi-Arabië, Sudan, Jemen.

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

Valentijn de Hingh has long used fashion to get her story across. But recently, the transgender model used her celebrity to amplify the stories of others in the LGBT community.

As part of the opening walk for Amsterdam’s annual EuroPride Parade, de Hingh — the parade’s first trans ambassador — modeled a patchwork gown made of flags from 72 countries where homosexuality is still outlawed, effectively transforming the celebration into a moment of protest.

The statement-cum-call-to-action was fashioned by designer Mattijs van Bergen and artist Oeri van Woezik in partnership with the COC Nederland, an Amsterdam-based LGBT advocacy organization dedicated to global LGBT equality as well as the decriminalization of sexual orientation and gender identity.

schermafbeelding-2016-10-07-om-18-55-44

In an Instagram post, de Hingh explained that the dress was still a work in the progress and that the collaborators hoped to replace individual flags with rainbow flags as legislation evolved.

For now, Dutch photographer and director Pieter Henket was present to capture the original tribute, which he shot in front of Rembrandt’s “The Night Watch” at Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum.

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]

A Dutch designer is making waves across the internet for a dress, designed in conjunction with EuroPride festivities, which is making both a fashion and political statement about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights on a global level.

Dutch fashion designer Mattijs van Bergen and spatial designer Oeri van Woezik presented the Amsterdam Rainbow Dress on Friday, which was created via a collaboration with Amsterdam. The bodice of the dress, worn by transgender model Valentijn de Hingh, was made with the image of the Amsterdam flag.

schermafbeelding-2016-10-07-om-18-50-18

The capital city of the Netherlands is known to be a safe haven for queer people. However, the rest of the gown is composed of flags from 72 countries around the world where it is illegal to be gay.

“Historically, Amsterdam has always been a safe haven for those who were not safe because of their ideas or because of who they were,” Chairman of COC Amsterdam Peter de Ruijter told The Huffington Post. “We wanted, however, to give an activating message, that this role as a safe haven is not automatic. It needs to be supported and upheld by the Amsterdam citizens from a shared understanding of equality for all… Given the current influx of refugees from the Middle East and Africa the dress signals to the Amsterdam citizens: contribute, involve yourselves, connect.”

Click here for the original article.

[sgmb id=1]